Friday, January 25, 2013

Wedding Dress Skirt Version 1.5

At least I have gotten started and tried, but I am far from satisfied. I want the skirt to look like this vintage McCalls pattern from the 1940s. I am sort of on the right track, but it needs some work.

So feel free to make any comments you like and tell me what makes this look so "off"!

The back is sort of on the right track, it has the fitted part and the drape. Now that I compare the two, though, it looks like the sides should fall closer to my knees on the upper skirt? Or what?
The front looks truly god awful. Granted, this fabric has some drape, but probably not enough. But still! It has no flow to it at all!
 The side is okay, try to ignore y uneven seam matching. This is just basted together. But you can see how the back has drape and the front has ZERO!

Gross. This is why you make muslins, so your wedding dress doesn't make you cry! 

Advice, please?


9 comments:

  1. I have no advice for you on the sewing part - but I think you have a fantastic start! I love the design you selected and had you not pointed out the parts about the drape etc, I thought it looked lovely. I can't wait to see more progress on your wedding dress!

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  2. What shape pattern piece did you start with? I'm guessing it needs to be a giant circle with the shaping for front and back happening in the middle if that makes sense. Hope that helps.

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    1. It's bias cut, so the back and front are separate pieces, both with the center placed on the fold. That's why I don't get why the back looks good and the front looks awful...

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  3. Molly the front needs more fabric - this means you have to cut and slash the patter to add enough fabric for it to fold like the back. I don't think it looks too bad but that's no the look you are going for.

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  4. I really dont know BUT I cant help but think the front is a shorter piece of fabric and that is why it looks different. Good luck, I know it will turn out to be beautiful--love you Mom

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  5. I agree with the previous comments. The front needs to have more fabric on the bottom than on the top, like on a circle skirt. It's easier to get a good drape on a convex shape than a concave piece. Try taking a circle skirt pattern and attach the CF to the CF of the main dress piece. Then just count off the inches you need to cover the bottom of the dress to the side seam, like pretending the bottom curved seam of the main dress body is a waistband and your attaching a "skirt" to it. Then you'll get lots of drape and the CF of the "skirt" piece will be cut on a fold and on straight grain...... If that makes sense. I so wish I could insert a pic right now... That's the best I can do. Hope it's a bit helpful. Good luck and its totally coming along nicely!

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    1. I thought it did, until I attached it and looked at it. I think the skirt has to be more than just 2 pieces to get the right flare...

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    2. What if you took the front piece you started with, slashed up the middle, and added a "godet" piece to add some flare then added more "godet" pieces equally on both sides. Then when you cut your fabric it will have that extra fabric swooshyness in the middle and hopefully the sides will be off grain enough for some good drape. There has to be a way to do it without having a seam run up the middle. What if you took a field trip to a bridal store and asked their seamstress. I bet they would love to talk shop. Then they could show you a real life example. Ill keep my peepers peeled while i scroll etsy. Maybe I'll find similar pattern with some piece of directions showing. Keep up the good work!

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    3. Ya know, now that I think of it, I have two patterns that have very similar tops to the McCall dress. If you want I can send you pics of them and if you loved it I could trace the bodice off for you.

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Thanks for your thoughts and feedback!